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The 70's Datebook for November 24

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In 1970, The nationʹs outstanding collegiate football player of the year received the annual Heisman Memorial Trophy this day. He was a quarterback for the Stanford Cardinal and later went on to a sterling career in the NFL: Jim Plunkett.

In 1970, The number one selling album: In both the U.S. and Britain, itʹs “LED ZEPPELIN III”

In 1970, “Stephen Stills” album by Stephen Stills was certified Gold by the RIAA

In 1971, The number one selling albums: In the U.S.: “Santana”; In Britain: John Lennonʹs “Imagine.”

In 1972, In a Brady Bunch episode called “Goodbye, Alice, Hello”, Alice decides to leave when she feels that she can no longer communicate with the kids; When the youngsters claim they canʹt trust Alice any more, the housekeeper makes up an excuse to leave and gets her own replacement. She isnʹt gone very long before the kids change their minds.

In 1972, The first show of Don Kirshnerʹs Rock Concert TV series “In Concert” premiered on ABC-TV. Among the attractions were the Allman Brothers Band, Chuck Berry, Blood Sweat and Tears, Alice Cooper, Seals and Crofts, and Poco. Robert W. Morgan (of KHJ, Los Angeles) was the offstage announcer for the show that was staged before a live audience. “In Concert” was the creation of the guy who dreamed up the fictitious group, “The Archies” and brought fame to “The Monkees”: rock promoter, Don Kirshner. ABC-TV hired him late in 1972 as impresario for the short-lived “In Concert” series on ABC Wide World of Entertainment to begin running the next year, but Kirshner, fed up with the ABC executives not knowing the difference between the Allman Brothers and the Osmond Brothers, left to start his own syndicated version in the fall of 1973. Some FM radio stations simulcasted the broadcast in stereo since broadcast television at the time had sound in only mono.

In 1973, On the cover of TV Guide: “Jacques Cousteau Explores Antarctica”. Other Articles: Waltons, Frankenstein, Milton Berle

In 1973, R.C., “Cheaper To Keep Her” by Johnnie Taylor peaked at #15 on the pop singles chart.

In 1973, R.C., “Photograph” by Ringo Starr peaked at number one on the pop singles chart.

In 1973, R.C., “Space Race” by Billy Preston peaked at number four on the pop singles chart.

In 1976, George Harrisonʹs “33 and ⅓” album was released.

In 1976, Wanted: The Outlaws, featuring Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Tompall Glaser and Jessi Colter, became the first country album to receive the new platinum certification, signifying one million units sold.

In 1978, David Letterman makes the first of 27 appearances performing standup comedy on the “Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson.” Says Letterman of his performance: “I did it and it worked beyond my wildest dreams, and I sat down and Johnny Carson is sitting right there and youʹre just talking and talking and praying to God itʹs over soon, and youʹre looking around and youʹre seeing stuff that youʹve seen on TV for years. And you canʹt let yourself think for a second, or you know, your head would explode, So youʹre talking and talking and talking and just praying, Oh please go to a commercial, please go to a goddamn commercial! And the next thing you know youʹre out of there and itʹs just, Holy Christ, I was on the 'Tonight' show”.

In 1978, TVʹS MIDNIGHT SPECIAL Host TED NUGENT (“CAT SCRATCH FEVER”, “STRANGLEHOLD”) plus, AC/DC (“SIN CITY”), AEROSMITH (“COME TOGETHER”), CHEAP TRICK (“CALIFORNIA MAN”, “SURRENDER”)

In 1979, R.C., “Dream Police” by Cheap Trick peaked at #26 on the pop singles chart.

In 1979, R.C., “Itʹs All I Can Do” by The Cars peaked at #41 on the pop singles chart.

In 1979, R.C., “Life During Wartime (This Ainʹt No Party…This Ainʹt No Disco…This Ainʹt No Foolin' Around)” by Talking Heads peaked at #80 on the pop singles chart.

In 1979, R.C., “No More Tears (Enough Is Enough)” by Barbra Streisand and Donna Summer peaked at number one on the pop singles chart.

In 1979, R.C., “Rainbow Connection” by Kermit The Frog (Jim Henson) peaked at #25 on the pop singles chart.

In 1971, "Black Beauty" was released by Paramount Pictures / Tigon British Film Productions; James Hill (director/screenplay); Wolf Mankowitz (screenplay); Mark Lester, Walter Slezak, Uschi Glas, Peter Lee Lawrence, Patrick Mower, John Nettleton, Maria Rohm, Margaret Lacey, Eddie Golden, Clive Geraghty, John Hoey, Patrick Gardiner, Brian McGrath; Drama, Family, Western; Live Action

In 1971, "Man in the Wilderness" was released by Warner Bros. / Limbridge Wilderness Films; Richard C. Sarafian (director); Jack DeWitt (screenplay); Richard Harris, John Huston, Henry Wilcoxon, Prunella Ransome, Percy Herbert, Dennis Waterman, Norman Rossington, James Doohan, Bryan Marshall, Ben Carruthers, John Bindon, Robert Russell, Bruce M. Fischer, Sheila Raynor, Judith Furse; Adventure, Drama, Western; Live Action

In 1974, "Murder on the Orient Express" was released in movie theaters in the U.S.A.

In 1978, "Carry On Emmannuelle" was released by The Rank Organisation / Hemdale Film Corporation; Gerald Thomas (director); Lance Peters (screenplay); Kenneth Williams, Kenneth Connor, Joan Sims, Jack Douglas, Peter Butterworth, Beryl Reid, Suzanne Danielle, Larry Dann, Henry McGee, Victor Maddern, Dino Shafeek, Eric Barker, Joan Benham, Albert Moses, Robert Dorning, Steve Plytas, Michael Nightingale, Bruce Boa, Llewellyn Rees, Claire Davenport, Norman Mitchell, Howard Nelson, Tim Brinton, Corbett Woodall, Gertan Klauber, John Carlin, John Hallet, Malcolm Johns, Guy Ward, Suzanna East; Comedy; Live Action

U.S. 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1973, ✪ “Cheaper To Keep Her” by Johnnie Taylor peaked at number 15 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1979, ✪ “Life During Wartime (This Ain't No Party)” by Talking Heads peaked at number 80 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1979, ✪ “Rainbow Connection” by Kermit The Frog (Jim Henson) peaked at number 25 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Back For A Taste Of Your Love” by Syl Johnson peaked at number 72 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Don't Drop My Love” by Anita Ward peaked at number 87 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Dream Police” by Cheap Trick peaked at number 26 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “It's All I Can Do” by The Cars peaked at number 41 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “No More Tears (Enough Is Enough)” by Barbra Streisand And Donna Summer peaked at number 1 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Ooh Baby” by Gilbert O'Sullivan peaked at number 25 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Photograph” by Ringo Starr peaked at number 1 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Please Don't Leave” by Lauren Wood peaked at number 24 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Slip Away” by Ian Lloyd peaked at number 50 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Space Race” by Billy Preston peaked at number 4 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Sweet Understanding Love” by The Four Tops peaked at number 33 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Vado Via” by Drupi peaked at number 88 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

Canada 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1979, “Broken-Hearted Me” by Anne Murray peaked at number 15 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Country Sunshine” by Dottie West peaked at number 68 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Dim All The Lights” by Donna Summer peaked at number 13 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Dirty White Boy” by Foreigner peaked at number 14 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Fins” by Jimmy Buffett peaked at number 64 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Gotta Go Home” by Boney M. peaked at number 35 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Hold On” by Ian Gomm peaked at number 44 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1979, “It's All I Can Do” by The Cars peaked at number 17 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Let Me Know (I Have A Right)” by Gloria Gaynor peaked at number 95 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Midnight Train To Georgia” by Gladys Knight And The Pips peaked at number 5 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Oh No, Not My Baby” by Rod Stewart peaked at number 51 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Photograph” by Ringo Starr peaked at number 1 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Victim Of Love” by Elton John peaked at number 46 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Wondering Where The Lions Are” by Bruce Cockburn peaked at number 39 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1979, “You Decorated My Life” by Kenny Rogers peaked at number 12 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1973, “You Were My Home” by Ken Stolz peaked at number 89 on the Canada pop singles chart.

U.K. 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1979, ✪ “Monkey Chop” by Dan-I peaked at number 30 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “A Night At Daddy Gee's” by Showaddywaddy peaked at number 39 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Crazy Little Thing Called Love” by Queen peaked at number 2 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Dancing In Outer Space” by Atmosfear peaked at number 46 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Daytona Demon” by Suzi Quatro peaked at number 14 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Do You Wanna Dance?” by Barry Blue peaked at number 7 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Fall Out” by The Police peaked at number 47 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “I Don't Want To Be A Freak” by Dynasty peaked at number 20 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Knocked It Off” by B.A. Robertson peaked at number 8 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Ladies Night” by Kool And The Gang peaked at number 9 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Let Your Heart Dance” by Secret Affair peaked at number 32 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Lonely Days Lonely Nights” by Don Downing peaked at number 34 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Pilot Of The Airwaves” by Charlie Dore peaked at number 66 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Rise” by Herb Alpert peaked at number 13 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Sad Eyes” by Robert John peaked at number 31 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Still” by The Commodores peaked at number 4 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “The Eton Rifles” by The Jam peaked at number 3 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “The Sparrow” by Ramblers peaked at number 11 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Tired Of Toein' The Line” by Rocky Burnette peaked at number 58 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Wild Love” by Mungo Jerry peaked at number 32 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

Australian 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1979, ✪ “Video Killed The Radio Star / Get Away William” by Bruce Woolley And The Camera Club peaked at number 94 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Angie / Silver Train” by The Rolling Stones peaked at number 1 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Can't Stand Losing You / So Lonely” by The Police peaked at number 98 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Cruel To Be Kind / Grey Ribbon” by Nick Lowe peaked at number 12 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Goosebumps / Ships That Pass In The Night” by Christie Allen peaked at number 3 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1979, “H.A.P.P.Y. Radio / My Friend” by Edwin Starr peaked at number 54 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Rise / Aranjuez, mon amour” by Herb Alpert peaked at number 19 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1973, “The Band Played The Boogie / Hang It on Me” by C.C.S. peaked at number 8 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1979, “The Lone Ranger / Neighbours” by Quantum Jump peaked at number 67 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Worlds Apart / Girl I Realise” by The Sinceros peaked at number 81 on the Australian pop singles chart.

New Zealand 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1979, “(Boogie Woogie) Dancin' Shoes” by Claudja Barry peaked at number 33 on the New Zealand pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Boy Oh Boy” by Racey peaked at number 12 on the New Zealand pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Dreaming” by Blondie peaked at number 9 on the New Zealand pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Heartache Tonight” by The Eagles peaked at number 7 on the New Zealand pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Heaven Must Have Sent You” by Bonnie Pointer peaked at number 21 on the New Zealand pop singles chart.

Netherlands 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1973, “Juanita” by Nick MacKenzie peaked at number 5 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Laugh And Walk Away” by The Shirts peaked at number 10 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Meine Freunde sind die Träume” by Vicky Leandros peaked at number 22 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Schönes Mädchen aus Arcadia” by Demis Roussos peaked at number 1 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Sorrow” by David Bowie peaked at number 29 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Verliefd, verloofd, getrouwd” by Frank And Mirella peaked at number 19 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1979, “We Got The Whole World In Our Hands” by Nottingham Forest With Paper Lace peaked at number 2 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Wonderful” by Colin Blunstone peaked at number 10 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

Norway 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1979, “Gimme! Gimme! Gimme! (A Man After Midnight)” by ABBA peaked at number 2 on the Norway pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Showdown” by Electric Light Orchestra peaked at number 9 on the Norway pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Street Life” by The Crusaders With Randy Crawford peaked at number 6 on the Norway pop singles chart.

In 1979, “We Don't Talk Anymore” by Cliff Richard peaked at number 1 on the Norway pop singles chart.

Switzerland 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1979, ✪ “Rama Lama Ding Dong” by Rocky Sharpe And The Replays peaked at number 7 on the Switzerland pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Heartache Tonight” by The Eagles peaked at number 10 on the Switzerland pop singles chart.

In 1973, “I'd Love You To Want Me” by Lobo peaked at number 1 on the Switzerland pop singles chart.

In 1973, “My Friend Stan” by Slade peaked at number 6 on the Switzerland pop singles chart.

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