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The 80's Datebook for May 6

Related Events on This Date

In 1980, NBC came to terms with its superstar, Johnny Carson on this day. Johnny signed a new three-year contract for approximately $5-million a year. Carson also reduced his “Tonight Show” to one hour from ninety minutes and cut his work week to four nights. Plus, he got billing in the showʹs title, as it became “The Tonight Show starring Johnny Carson”. Little known fact: The striped and brightly colored curtain that Johnny walked through was HIS curtain. He bought it as part of his new contract as Carson Productions, the owner of the show. Only Carson was allowed to walk through the curtain. When Johnny was on vacation or off for any reason, the guest host had to come through the standard NBC curtain. The striped one was always hung above the stage until Johnny was there. It is reported that shortly after Jay Leno was named to replace Johnny, the curtain came down, was folded and boxed for Johnny to take away. Youʹll notice that there is no such curtain today, though Lenoʹs “Tonight Show” is taped in the very same studio. And, yes, Johnny got to keep the props on his desk — what was left of them. A member of the studio audience allegedly swiped the cigarette box at the end of the final show.

In 1980, “Laverne and Shirley”. When Lenny and his pal Squiggy inherit a diner from Lennyʹs recently “decreased” Uncle Lazlo, Laverne and Shirleyʹs nincompoop neighbors try their hands as restaurateurs. But the greasy spoon, rechristened Dead Lazloʹs Place and now offering dog racing with every meal, is such a flop that, as Squiggy says, “even the dogs go out to eat.” When the girls take over the joint for half the profits, it makes for one of the funniest bits of physical comedy since Lucy and Ethel went to work in a candy factory (see number 12). Lone waitress Shirley refills coffee cups after every sip, sneezes on someoneʹs spaghetti and drops armloads of food. Meanwhile, inept grill girl Laverne cooks up “hash blacks,” flips oversize pancakes with a dustpan and, because it sounds more “diner-y,” insists on calling Shirley Betty. “Betty, please pick up your weenies,” Laverne says over the kitchen microphone. Betty later surveys her busy day: “I got $14 in tips and the opportunity to bear the child of a man named Bruno.”

In 1980, “Mork and Mindy” Robin Williamsʹ outrageous, turbo-comic brilliance has never been better showcased than in “Morkʹs Mixed Emotions.”A kiss from Mindy uncorks the entire gamut of the space cadetʹs long-pent-up feelings. What follows is a dizzying, dazzling display of Williamsʹ unfettered inventiveness and versatility. One after another, Morkʹs carefully repressed emotions come ricocheting out, each of them punctuated by a different voice. He is by turns loving, fearful, joyful, guilty, envious, hopeful, disgusted, and grateful. And thatʹs the warm-up. Thank goodness for the commercials, or youʹd never have a chance to catch your breath.

In 1981, Jerry Seinfeld first appearred on “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson” to do a stand-up routine.

In 1982, Alabama released "Take Me Down" the second single from their album Mountain Music. Written by Exile band members Mark Gray and J.P. Pennington, the song was originally recorded by Exile in 1980 but failed to become a hit. The track was the seventh in a string of 21 consecutive #1 singles for Alabama in as many releases, a string that spanned from 1980 through 1987.

In 1983, The 1971 movie “And Now for Something Completely Different” opened in movie theaters in Germany.

In 1983, “Weird Al” Yankovic gave a live performance at The Spirit in San Diego, California.

In 1984, “Spinal Tap,” the fictional rock group formed to star in a neo-documentary about a heavy metal band, played a real concert at New Yorkʹs CBGBs club.

In 1984, “V: The Final Battle” began on NBC.

In 1985, 20th Century Fox announced they would purchase the Metromedia TV stations, paving the way for the Fox Broadcast Network to debut in October 1986.

In 1985, On Santa Barbara, Augusta (Louise Sorel) realized she was blind and called her sister Julia in Phoenix. This was Nancy Lee Grahn's first appearance as Julia Wainwright.

In 1986, It was on this night that comedienne, Joan Rivers, put her foot in her mouth by announcing to the world that she was leaving “The Tonight Show” as permanent guest host to begin her own late-night gabfest on the new FOX TV Network. It would be a show that would compete head-to-head with Johnny Carson — and he was not happy at the news. Claiming that when she tried to call Carson to tell him personally, he refused to talk to her, Rivers also claimed that Carson hung up on her when she did get the message to him. On the “Tonight Show”, she had nothing but praise for her mentor, but it caused a lot of friction between the two — and lots of jokes for Johnny. Foxʹs ratings also nosedived soon after she debuted.

In 1987, Niroslav Milhailovic begins 54 hours of telling jokes.

In 1987, On the season finale of Dynasty, Alexis' (Joan Collins) car plunged off a bridge.

In 1988, Doughnutgate incident: New Jersey Devilsʹ coach Jim Schoenfeld tells referee Don Koharski to “eat another doughnut you fat pig!” Later, he was suspended.

In 1989, R.C., “Cult Of Personality” by Living Colour peaked at #13 on the pop singles chart.

In 1983, "Still Smokin" was released by Paramount Pictures; Tommy Chong (director/screenplay); Cheech Marin (screenplay); Cheech Marin, Tommy Chong; Comedy; Live Action

In 1983, "Doctor Detroit" was released by Universal Studios / Brillstein Company; Michael Pressman (director); Bruce Jay Friedman, Carl Gottlieb, Robert Boris (screenplay); Dan Aykroyd, Howard Hesseman, George Furth, James Brown, T.K. Carter, Donna Dixon, Fran Drescher, Lydia Lei, Lynn Whitfield, Kate Murtagh, Nan Martin, Peter Aykroyd, Glenne Headly, Robert Cornthwaite, Parley Baer, John Kapelos, Steven Williams, Andrew Duggan, Blackie Dammett, Cacey Kustosz; Comedy; Live Action

In 1984, "The Last Days of Pompeii" was released by ABC / Columbia TriStar Television / RAI Radiotelevisione Italiana / David Gerber Productions / Centerpoint; Peter R. Hunt (director); Edward George Bulwer-Lytton, Carmen Culver (screenplay); Ned Beatty, Brian Blessed, Ernest Borgnine, Nicholas Clay, Lesley-Anne Down, Olivia Hussey, Siobhán McKenna, Franco Nero, Linda Purl, Anthony Quayle, Duncan Regehr, Laurence Olivier, Benedict Taylor, Gerry Sundquist, Catriona MacColl, Malcolm Jamieson, Tony Anholt, David Robb, Stephen Greif, Peter Cellier, Barry Stokes, Howard Lang, Marilù Tolo, Joyce Blair, Francesca Romana Coluzzi, Brian Croucher, Willoughby Goddard, George Claydon, Michael Quill, Brian Coburn, Christopher Ellison, Bernard Kay, Howard Goorney, Jill Melford, Peter Howell; Action, Drama, History; Live Action

In 1984, "V The Final Battle" was released by NBC / Warner Bros. Television / Blatt-Singer Productions; Richard T. Heffron (director); Brian Taggart, Peggy Goldman, Diane Frolov, Faustus Buck (teleplay/story); Lillian Weezer, Harry & Renee Longstreet (story); Marc Singer, Faye Grant, Jane Badler, Andrew Prine, Richard Herd, Michael Durrell, Michael Ironside, David Packer, Peter Nelson, Blair Tefkin, Robert Englund, Michael Wright, Sandy Simpson, Denise Galik, Thomas Hill, Mickey Jones, Viveka Davis, Neva Patterson, Jason Bernard, Hansford Rowe, Jenny Sullivan, Diane Civita, Eric Johnston, Jenny Beck, Sarah Douglas, Frank Ashmore, Greta Blackburn, Stack Pierce; Action, Adventure, Sci-Fi; Live Action

In 1988, "Dead Heat" was released by New World Pictures; Mark Goldblatt (director); Terry Black (screenplay); Treat Williams, Joe Piscopo, Darren McGavin, Lindsay Frost, Vincent Price, Clare Kirkconnell, Keye Luke, Robert Picardo, Mel Stewart, Professor Toru Tanaka, Martha Quinn, Shane Black, Beth Toussaint; Action, Comedy, Horror; Live Action

In 1988, "Jack's Back" was released by Palisades Entertainment; Rowdy Herrington (director/screenplay); James Spader, Cynthia Gibb, Jim Haynie, Robert Picardo, Rod Loomis, Rex Ryon, Chris Mulkey, Mario Machado, Danitza Kingsley; Crime, Horror; Live Action

In 1988, "Salsa" was released by The Cannon Group, Inc. / A Golan-Globus Production; Boaz Davidson (director/screenplay); Tomas Benitez, Shepard Goldman (screenplay); Robby Rosa, Rodney Harvey, Miranda Garrison, Angela Alvarado, Valente Rodriquez, Renee Victor, Bobby Caldwell, Chain Reaction, Willie Colon, Celia Cruz, Mavis Vegas Davis, Marisela Esqueda, Grupo Latino, La Dimencion, Mongo Santamaria, Kenny Ortega, Tito Puente, Michael Sembello, German Wilkins Velez, The Edwin Hawkins Singers; Romance; Live Action

In 1988, "Shakedown" was released by Universal Pictures; James Glickenhaus (director/screenplay); Peter Weller, Sam Elliott, Patricia Charbonneau, Jude Ciccolella, Antonio Fargas, Blanche Baker, Richard Brooks, John C. McGinley, Thomas G. Waites, Tom Mardirosian, Anthony Crivello; Crime, Drama, Action; Live Action

In 1988, "Wings of Desire" was released by Orion Classics / Road Movies Filmproduktion / Argos Films / Westdeutscher Rundfunk; Wim Wenders (director/screenplay); Peter Handke, Richard Reitinger (screenplay); Bruno Ganz, Solveig Dommartin, Otto Sander, Curt Bois, Peter Falk, Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, Crime & the City Solution; Romance, Fantasy; Live action

U.S. 1980s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1989, “A Shoulder To Cry On” by Tommy Page peaked at number 29 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Cult Of Personality” by Living Colour peaked at number 13 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Room To Move” by Animotion peaked at number 9 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Second Chance” by 38 Special peaked at number 6 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Seventeen” by Winger peaked at number 26 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Thinking Of You” by Sa-Fire peaked at number 12 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

Canada 1980s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1989, ✪ “Funky Cold Medina” by Tone Loc peaked at number 7 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Cult Of Personality” by Living Colour peaked at number 22 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Rocket” by Def Leppard peaked at number 1 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1989, “She's My Inspiration” by Barney Bentall And The Legendary Hearts peaked at number 14 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1989, “The Look” by Roxette peaked at number 2 on the Canada pop singles chart.

Alt-Canada 1980s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1989, ✪ “Walk The Dinosaur” by Was (Not Was) peaked at number 6 on the Alt-Canada pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Dreamin'” by Vanessa Williams peaked at number 16 on the Alt-Canada pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Hearts On Fire” by Steve Winwood peaked at number 41 on the Alt-Canada pop singles chart.

In 1989, “It's Only Love” by Simply Red peaked at number 30 on the Alt-Canada pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Let The River Run” by Carly Simon peaked at number 50 on the Alt-Canada pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Now You're In Heaven” by Julian Lennon peaked at number 39 on the Alt-Canada pop singles chart.

In 1989, “The Look” by Roxette peaked at number 2 on the Alt-Canada pop singles chart.

U.K. 1980s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1989, ✪ “Are You Ready For Freddy” by Fat Boys peaked at number 83 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1989, ✪ “Me, Myself And I” by De La Soul peaked at number 22 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Bring Me Some Water” by Melissa Etheridge peaked at number 100 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Do You Like It” by Kingdom Come peaked at number 73 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Hairstyle Of The Devil” by Momus peaked at number 94 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Hardcore Hip House” by Tyree peaked at number 70 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Heaven Help Me” by Deon Estus With George Michael peaked at number 41 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “I'll Be There For You” by Bon Jovi peaked at number 18 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “King For A Day” by XTC peaked at number 82 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Let The River Run” by Carly Simon peaked at number 79 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Lolly Lolly” by Wendy And Lisa peaked at number 64 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Move Closer” by Tom Jones peaked at number 49 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Nobody Knows” by Mike + The Mechanics peaked at number 81 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Real Love” by El DeBarge peaked at number 97 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Saved” by The Swans peaked at number 96 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Shelter” by Circuit peaked at number 93 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “The Raindance” by Dare peaked at number 62 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Thrill Has Gone” by Texas peaked at number 60 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “We Play Ska” by Children Of The Night peaked at number 92 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1989, “You're The One” by Bang peaked at number 74 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

Australian 1980s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1989, ✪ “Wild Thing” by Sam Kinison peaked at number 19 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Chained To The Wheel” by The Black Sorrows peaked at number 9 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1989, “I'd Rather Jack” by The Reynolds Girls peaked at number 43 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Lost In Your Eyes” by Debbie Gibson peaked at number 7 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1989, “My Prerogative” by Bobby Brown peaked at number 40 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1989, “The Beat(en) Generation” by The The peaked at number 50 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Veronica” by Elvis Costello peaked at number 27 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Wild Thing” by Tone Loc peaked at number 15 on the Australian pop singles chart.

New Zealand 1980s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1989, “Bring It Back Again” by Stray Cats peaked at number 24 on the New Zealand pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Crackers International” by Erasure peaked at number 40 on the New Zealand pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Lucky Charm” by The Boys [U.S. R And B] peaked at number 35 on the New Zealand pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Mind On My Sleeve” by Chicago Smokeshop peaked at number 37 on the New Zealand pop singles chart.

In 1989, “She Won't Talk To Me” by Luther Vandross peaked at number 17 on the New Zealand pop singles chart.

In 1989, “The Living Years” by Mike + The Mechanics peaked at number 11 on the New Zealand pop singles chart.

In 1989, “The Look” by Roxette peaked at number 1 on the New Zealand pop singles chart.

Netherlands 1980s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1989, “1-2-3” by Gloria Estefan And The Miami Sound Machine peaked at number 13 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Change His Ways” by Robert Palmer peaked at number 47 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Kokomo” by The Beach Boys peaked at number 4 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Ordinary Lives” by The Bee Gees peaked at number 27 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Speciale aanbieding” by Het Goede Doel And V.O.F. De Kunst peaked at number 40 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1989, “The Look” by Roxette peaked at number 2 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Too Many Broken Hearts” by Jason Donovan peaked at number 3 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Turn The World Around” by Golden Earring peaked at number 8 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

Sweden 1980s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1989, “Nu tar vi dom” by Håkan Södergren And Hockeylandslaget peaked at number 2 on the Sweden pop singles chart.

In 1989, “This Is Your Land” by Simple Minds peaked at number 18 on the Sweden pop singles chart.

In 1989, “When Love Comes To Town” by U2 With B.B. King peaked at number 20 on the Sweden pop singles chart.

France 1980s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1989, “Leave Me Alone” by Michael Jackson peaked at number 17 on the France pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Two Hearts” by Phil Collins peaked at number 24 on the France pop singles chart.

Switzerland 1980s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1989, “Julia” by Pino Panduri peaked at number 30 on the Switzerland pop singles chart.

In 1989, “Ordinary Lives” by The Bee Gees peaked at number 9 on the Switzerland pop singles chart.

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