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The 70's Datebook for October 20

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In 1970, After a three year absence, Muhammad Ali TKOʹs Jerry Quarry in the third round.

In 1972, In a Brady Bunch episode called “Cyrano de Brady”, Peterʹs crush on Janʹs new girlfriend Kerry is frustrated so he enlists Gregʹs help; after his own efforts fail to attract Kerry, Peter goes to Greg for help. Greg plays Cyrano for Peter but it results in Kerry rejecting Peter for Greg.

In 1973, Canadian actor William Shatner (Star Trek) marries Marcy Lafferty.

In 1973, In the so-called “Saturday Night Massacre,” special Watergate prosecutor Archibald Cox was dismissed and Attorney General Elliot L. Richardson and Deputy Attorney General William B. Ruckleshaus resigned; the resulting firestorm of criticism prompted appointment of a new special prosecutor, Leon Jaworski.

In 1973, On the cover of TV Guide: “Telly Savalas of Kojak”. Other Articles: Randolph Mantooth of Emergency, 60 Minutes

In 1973, R.C., “Angie” by Rolling Stones peaked at number one on the pop singles chart.

In 1973, R.C., “Basketball Jones Featuring Tyrone Shoelaces” by Cheech and Chong peaked at #15 on the pop singles chart; it was a parody of “Love Jones” by Brighter Side Of Darkness.

In 1973, Reggie Jackson of Oakland had RBI doubles in the first and third innings to lead the Aʹs to a 3-1 triumph over the New York Mets and force a seventh game in the World Series.

In 1973, Steve Millerʹs “The Joker” was released.

In 1973, “ABCʹs Suspense Theatre” airs “Wine, Women and War,” the second in a series of movies based on Martin Caidinʹs novel “Cyborg.” After one more TV-movie outing in November on “Suspense Theatre,” the adventures of Colonel Steve Austin will become a weekly series called “The Six Million Dollar Man.” Heroic mayhem ensues.

In 1974, “Weekend” debuts on NBC with host Lloyd Dobyns. An experimental mix of hard news, odd features (“The Pigeon Wars”), sarcastic commentary and running cartoons, this offbeat late-night newsmagazine airs once a month, and will alternate with “Saturday Night Live” once that program starts.

In 1976, Charlieʹs Angels starlet Farrah Fawcett accidentally pops out of her detective outfit, exposing a bare breast, during an episode called Angels in Chains. (Apparently, the editors were too engrossed in the plot to catch this mistake before airtime.)

In 1976, Led Zeppelinʹs film, “The Song Remains the Same,” is a mixture of concrete footage and fantasy sequences, premieres in London.

In 1976, “A Night On The Town” album by Rod Stewart was certified Gold by the RIAA

In 1977, “The Richard Pryor Show”, TV Variety; last aired on NBC.

In 1978, The Police gave their U.S. performance debut at CBGBʹs in New York City.

In 1978, “Dire Straits” album by Dire Straits was released

In 1979, Bob Dylan introduces his born-again gospel-rock to the nation as he performs “Serve Somebody” on NBCʹs on “Saturday Night Live.”

In 1979, John Tate beat Gerrie Coetzee with a 15-round decision in Pretoria, South Africa, to win the vacant WBA heavyweight title.

In 1979, On the cover of TV Guide: “cast of WKRP in Cincinnatti”. Other Articles: The Lazarus Syndrome

In 1979, R.C., “Video Killed The Radio Star” by the Buggles peaked at number one on the United Kingdom pop singles chart.

In 1979, The Eagles “The Long Run” enters the U.S. album charts at number two.

In 1971, "Catlow" was released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer; Sam Wanamaker (director); Scott Finch, J.J. Griffith (screenplay); Yul Brynner, Richard Crenna, Leonard Nimoy, Daliah Lavi, Jo Ann Pflug, Jeff Corey, Michael Delano, Julián Mateos, David Ladd, Bob Logan, John Clark, Dan van Husen, Bessie Love, José Nieto, Angel del Pozo, Victor Israel, Tito Garcia, Walter Coy; Comedy, Western; Live Action

In 1971, "The Organization" was released by United Artists / The Mirisch Corporation; Don Medford (director); James R. Webb (screenplay); Sidney Poitier, Barbara McNair, Gerald S. O'Loughlin, Sheree North, Fred Beir, Allen Garfield, Graham Jarvis, Raúl Juliá, James A. Watson Jr., Ron O'Neal, Bernie Hamilton, Charles H. Gray, Jarion Monroe, Daniel J. Travanti, Billy Green Bush, Max Gail, Ross Hagen, Paul Jenkins, John Lasell, Garry Walberg, Demond Wilson, Johnny Haymer, John Alvin, Oscar Beregi Jr.; Action, Crime, Drama, Thriller; Live Action

In 1971, "Play Misty for Me" was released by Universal Pictures / The Malpaso Company; Clint Eastwood (director); Jo Heims, Dean Riesner (screenplay); Clint Eastwood, Jessica Walter, Donna Mills, John Larch, Jack Ging, Irene Hervey, James McEachin, Clarice Taylor, Donald Siegel, Johnny Otis, Joe Zawinul, Cannonball Adderley, Duke Everts, Britt Lind, Jack Kosslyn; Drama, Thriller; Live Action

In 1971, "The Todd Killings" was released by National General Pictures; Barry Shear (director); Dennis Murphy, Joel Oliansky (screenplay); Robert F. Lyons, Richard Thomas, Belinda Montgomery, Barbara Bel Geddes, James Broderick, Gloria Grahame, Harry Lauter, Holly Near, Ed Asner, Fay Spain, Michael Conrad, William Lucking, Michael Rupert, Meg Foster, George Murdock, Eddie Firestone, Eve Brent, Clete Roberts, Jason Wingreen, Forrest Lewis, Jack Riley, Guy Wilkerson, Geoffrey Lewis; Crime, Drama, Thriller; Live Action

In 1971, "T.R. Baskin" was released by Paramount Pictures; Herbert Ross (director); Peter Hyams (screenplay); Candice Bergen, Peter Boyle, James Caan, Marcia Rodd, Howard Platt, Mike Nussbaum; Drama; Live Action

In 1978, "Attack of the Killer Tomatoes" was released by NAI Entertainment; John DeBello (director/screenplay); Costa Dillon, Stephen Peace (screenplay); David Miller, George Wilson, Sharon Taylor, Stephen Peace, Costa Dillon, Ernie Meyers, Eric Christmas, Ron Shapiro, Al Sklar, Jerry Anderson, Jack Riley, Gary Smith, John Qualls, Geoff Ramsey, Ryan Shields, Benita Barton, Don Birch, Tom Coleman, Art K. Koustik, Jack Nolen, Paul Oya, Robert Rudd, Byron Teegarden, Michael Seewald, Steve Cates, Dean Grell, Dana Ashbrook; Adventure, Comedy, Horror; Live Action

In 1978, "Despair" was released by New Line Cinema; Rainer Werner Fassbinder (director); Tom Stoppard (screenplay); Dirk Bogarde, Andréa Ferréol, Klaus Lowitsch, Volker Spengler, Peter Kern, Alexander Allerson, Gottfried John, Hark Bohm, Bernhard Wicki, Adrian Hoven, Roger Fritz, Armin Meier, Ingrid Caven, Y Sa Lo, Voli Geiler; Drama, History; Live Action

U.S. 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1973, ✪ “Basketball Jones Featuring Tyrone Shoelaces” by Cheech And Chong peaked at number 15 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Angie” by The Rolling Stones peaked at number 1 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Hey, Little Girl” by The Sylvers (Foster Sylvers) peaked at number 92 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “I'll Never Love This Way Again” by Dionne Warwick peaked at number 5 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Midnight Wind” by John Stewart peaked at number 28 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Plain Jane” by Sammy Hagar peaked at number 77 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Redneck Friend” by Jackson Browne peaked at number 85 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Ridin' My Thumb Down To Mexico” by Johnny Rodriguez peaked at number 70 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Rise” by Herb Alpert peaked at number 1 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Rocky Mountain Way” by Joe Walsh peaked at number 23 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Rubber Bullets” by 10cc peaked at number 73 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Since You've Been Gone” by Cherie And Marie Currie peaked at number 95 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Starry Eyes” by The Records peaked at number 56 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Sure Know Something” by KISS peaked at number 47 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1973, “This Time It's Real” by Tower Of Power peaked at number 65 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Woman From Tokyo” by Deep Purple peaked at number 60 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1973, “You're The Best Thing That Ever Happened To Me” by Ray Price peaked at number 82 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

Canada 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1979, “Arrow Through Me” by Paul McCartney peaked at number 27 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Dependin' On You” by The Doobie Brothers peaked at number 33 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Different Worlds (Theme From 'Angie')” by Maureen McGovern peaked at number 48 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Free Ride” by The Edgar Winter Group peaked at number 8 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Get A Move On” by Eddie Money peaked at number 59 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Get Up And Boogie” by Freddie James peaked at number 22 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Hot Summer Nights” by Night peaked at number 23 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1973, “In The Midnight Hour” by Cross Country peaked at number 34 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Lead Me On” by Maxine Nightingale peaked at number 2 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Let Me In” by The Osmonds peaked at number 15 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Ramblin' Man” by The Allman Brothers Band peaked at number 7 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Sad Eyes” by Robert John peaked at number 3 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Send A Little Love My Way” by Anne Murray peaked at number 25 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Stillsane” by Carolyne Mas peaked at number 53 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Tonight” by Raspberries peaked at number 80 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Welcome Home” by Peters And Lee peaked at number 87 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1973, “You've Never Been This Far Before” by Conway Twitty peaked at number 30 on the Canada pop singles chart.

U.K. 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1979, ✪ “Video Killed The Radio Star” by The Buggles peaked at number 1 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1973, “5:15” by The Who peaked at number 20 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Back Of My Hand” by Jags peaked at number 17 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Charade” by Skids peaked at number 31 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Don't Stop 'Til You Get Enough” by Michael Jackson peaked at number 3 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Good Girls Don't” by The Knack peaked at number 66 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Memories” by PiL (Public Image Limited) peaked at number 60 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Queen Of Hearts” by Dave Edmunds peaked at number 11 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “The Great Rock And Roll Swindle” by Sex Pistols And Tenpole Tudor peaked at number 21 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1979, “The Shape Of Things To Come” by The Headboys peaked at number 45 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

Australian 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1979, ✪ “If I Said You Had A Beautiful Body, Would You Hold It Against Me / Make Me Over” by The Bellamy Brothers peaked at number 12 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1979, ✪ “Reasons To Be Cheerful, Part 3 / Common As Muck” by Ian Dury And The Blockheads peaked at number 65 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Katy Kool Lady / I'll Make Love To You Anytime” by J.J. Cale peaked at number 98 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Live And Let Die / I Lie Around” by Paul McCartney And Wings peaked at number 5 on the Australian pop singles chart.

New Zealand 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1979, “Ain't That A Shame” by Cheap Trick peaked at number 24 on the New Zealand pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Are 'Friends' Electric?” by Tubeway Army peaked at number 8 on the New Zealand pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Born To Be Alive” by Patrick Hernandez peaked at number 1 on the New Zealand pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Cruel To Be Kind” by Nick Lowe peaked at number 34 on the New Zealand pop singles chart.

In 1979, “I Want You To Want Me (Live)” by Cheap Trick peaked at number 23 on the New Zealand pop singles chart.

Netherlands 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1979, ✪ “If I Said You Had A Beautiful Body, Would You Hold It Against Me” by The Bellamy Brothers peaked at number 11 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Angie” by The Rolling Stones peaked at number 1 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Dag zuster Ursula” by Rob de Nijs peaked at number 4 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Don't Stop 'Til You Get Enough” by Michael Jackson peaked at number 2 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Harem Lied” by Vader Abraham en Zijn Goede Zonen peaked at number 25 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1979, “In Santo Domingo” by Zangeres Zonder Naam peaked at number 42 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Ooh Baby” by Gilbert O'Sullivan peaked at number 18 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Sail On” by The Commodores peaked at number 8 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Surprise, Surprise” by Mac Kissoon peaked at number 33 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Whatever You Want” by Status Quo peaked at number 5 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

Sweden 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1979, “Chinese Girl” by The Korgis peaked at number 16 on the Sweden pop singles chart.

In 1979, “New York By Night” by Dennis Parker peaked at number 15 on the Sweden pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Oh! Susie” by Secret Service peaked at number 1 on the Sweden pop singles chart.

In 1979, “Sad Eyes” by Robert John peaked at number 19 on the Sweden pop singles chart.

Norway 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1973, “Barn av regnbuen” by Lillebjørn Nilsen peaked at number 1 on the Norway pop singles chart.

In 1973, “Yesterday Once More” by The Carpenters peaked at number 6 on the Norway pop singles chart.

Switzerland 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1973, “The Ballroom Blitz” by The Sweet peaked at number 3 on the Switzerland pop singles chart.

In 1979, “We Don't Talk Anymore” by Cliff Richard peaked at number 1 on the Switzerland pop singles chart.

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