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The 70's Datebook for October 30

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In 1970, In a Brady Bunch episode called “Call Me Irresponsible”, Greg gets a part-time job at his fatherʹs architectural firm so he can buy a car, Greg plans to have a car in two years and starts collecting gas money for rides in advance from his brothers and sisters. However, he loses some important designs the first day on the job and is fired.

In 1971, John Lennonʹs “Imagine” hits number one. Itʹs the ex-Beatleʹs only solo LP to sell a million copies and his most popular album until “Double Fantasy.” “Double Fantasy” becomes number one shortly after his assassination on December 8, 1980.

In 1971, John Lennonʹs “Imagine” LP was topped the album chart in the U.S.; it was released to the United Kingdom the same day where it went to number one on the British album charts as well.

In 1971, On the cover of TV Guide: “Larry Hagman and Donna Mills of The Good Life”. Other Articles: Longstreet, Glen Campbell

In 1972, Pop singer Elton John appeared at a command performance benefit for the Queen of England, making him the first rock and roller to be asked to appear in a royal variety performance since the Beatles in November 1963.

In 1972, TVʹS “BILL COSBY SHOW” Musical Guest: RAY CHARLES

In 1972, Two commuter trains crashed in Chicago, killing 45 people and injuring more than 300. It was the countryʹs worst rail disaster in 14 years and it wouldnʹt be eclipsed for another two decades.

In 1972, “Close To The Edge” album by Yes was certified Gold by the RIAA

In 1972, “Iʹll Be Around” single by Spinners was certified Gold by the RIAA

In 1973, A New York radio station aired the unedited “Seven Words You Cnnot Say on Television” off Geroge Carlinʹs LP “Class Clown.” A man complained about the offensive words and complained to the FCC. The FCC essentially put the station on “probation” with the threat of considering revoking its license if the station airs any more offensive material.

In 1973, John Lennon releases the “Mind Games” album and the title track as a single. Both become his most popular records in quite some time. The album reaches number nine, the single #18. The same day, Ringo Starrʹs “Ringo” is released.

In 1973, Metsʹ pitcher Tom Seaver (19-10, 2.08) wins the NLʹs Cy Young Award, outpointing runners-up Mike Marshall (Expos, 31 saves) and Ron Bryant (Giants, 24-12). The 27-year-old New York right-hander is the first recipient of the prestigious pitching prize not to post twenty victories.

In 1974, Ali vs. Foreman: “THE RUMBLE IN THE JUNGLE”; the battle between 32-year-old Muhammad Ali and George Foreman, a grim young Goliath, was staged with great fanfare in Kinshasa, Zaire. Ali unveiled his rope-a-dope tactic: leaning back, swaying side to side, absorbing Foremanʹs brutal punches. Had Ali lost his mind? By round six, madness looked like genius. Foreman was exhausted; Ali was throwing flurries. In the eighth, an Ali right sent Foreman into a slow, staggering twirl to the canvas. Eight rounds were enough for Muhammad Ali to regain his world heavyweight title in Zaire, Africa.

In 1974, Principal shooting begins on a film version of The Rocky Horror Picture Show.

In 1974, The wonder of closed-circuit TV enables boxing fans outside Zaire to watch Muhammad Ali rope-a-dope George Foreman to recapture the heavyweight championship. Years later, boxing fans will have the option of pay-per-view.

In 1975, After finishing fifth in the National League West, the Atlanta Braves made a change.…They fired…the chimpanzee that swept the bases after the fifth inning.

In 1975, With dictator Francisco Franco near death, Prince Juan Carlos assumed power in Spain. (Franco died three weeks later.)

In 1976, Chevy Chase leaves “Saturday Night” to work on a series of comedy specials for NBC.

In 1976, Jane Pauley becomes news co-anchor of the Today Show. She looks strikingly similar to Jane Curtin, who, conincidentally enough, would be a replacement for the departed Chevy Chase to anchor the Weekend Update feature on NBCʹs Saturday Night (retroactively titled Saturday Night Live.)

In 1976, On the cover of TV Guide: “Governor Jimmy Carter and President Gerald Ford”. Other Articles: Jeffersons, Tom Ewell.

In 1976, TVʹS “SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE” Host: BUCK HENRY; Musical Guests: THE BAND (“THE NIGHT THEY DROVE OLD DIXIE DOWN”)

In 1976, “Doc”, TV Comedy; last aired on CBS. The Doctor was out!

In 1976, “Mr. T And Tina”, TV Comedy, mercifully, last aired on ABC after bombing for just over a month. Itʹs not to be confused with the Mr. T that was famous in 1983 for the TV series “The ʹAʹ Team.”

In 1977, Walter Payton of the Chicago Bears rushed for 205 yards and two touchdowns in a 26-0 triumph over the Green Bay Packers. He had a better season than O.J. Simpson that year.

In 1977, “Halloween With The Addams Family” aired.

In 1978, COVER OF PEOPLE ROBIN WILLIAMS and PAM DAWBER

In 1978, The made-for-TV-animated cartoon movie, “KISS Meets The Phantom Of The Park”, starring comic book, heavy-metal, glitter rockers KISS as the heroes trying to foil a mad scientist working in an amusement park, aired on NBC.

In 1978, “A.M. Weather” began airing on PBS

In 1978, “Macho Man” single by Village People was certified Gold by the RIAA

In 1978, “WKRP in Cincinnati” TV shows traditionally greet holidays with a hug, but not WKRP. In “Turkeys Away,” which was based on a true story, station manager Arthur Carlson (Gordon Jump) announces plans to unveil a secret promotional event, and newsman Les Nessman (Richard Sanders) shows up at the local mall to cover it live. A helicopter comes into view. Mr. Carlson is aboard. So are 20 live turkeys — which, to Lesʹs horror, are hurled to their deaths. “Oh, the humanity,” Les wails, evoking the Hindenberg while fowl balls plummet to the parking lot. Mr. Carlson is shocked. “As God is my witness,” he says, “I thought turkeys could fly.”

In 1978, "Message from Space" was released by Toei Company / Tohokushinsha Film; Kinji Fukasaku (director); Hiro Matusda (screenplay); Vic Morrow, Sonny Chiba, Philip Casnoff, Peggy Lee Brennan, Etsuko Shihomi, Tetsuro Tamba, Mikio Narita, Makoto Satō, Hiroyuki Sanada, Hideyo Amamoto, Junkichi Orimoto, Isamu Shimizu, Masazumi Okabe, Noboru Mitani, Harumi Sone, Charles Scawthorn; Action, Adventure, Sci-Fi; Live Action

U.S. 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1971, ✪ “Spill The Wine” by The Isley Brothers peaked at number 49 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1976, “California Day” by Starland Vocal Band peaked at number 66 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1976, “Cowboy Song” by Thin Lizzy peaked at number 77 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1976, “Flowers” by The Emotions peaked at number 87 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1976, “If I Only Could” by The Rowans peaked at number 74 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1976, “Mr. Melody” by Natalie Cole peaked at number 49 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1976, “She's Gone” by Daryl Hall And John Oates peaked at number 7 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1976, “The Raven” by The Alan Parsons Project peaked at number 80 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1971, “Thin Line Between Love And Hate” by Persuaders peaked at number 15 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1976, “This One's For You” by Barry Manilow peaked at number 29 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1971, “Trapped By A Thing Called Love” by Denise LaSalle peaked at number 13 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1971, “Women's Love Rights” by Laura Lee peaked at number 36 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

In 1971, “You Think You're Hot Stuff” by Jean Knight peaked at number 57 on the U.S. pop singles chart.

Canada 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1971, “Build A Tower” by Brahman peaked at number 50 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1971, “Do You Know What I Mean” by Lee Michaels peaked at number 6 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1971, “First Sign Of Love” by Wishbone peaked at number 65 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1976, “Here's Some Love” by Tanya Tucker peaked at number 91 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1976, “I Got To Know” by Starbuck peaked at number 36 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1976, “I'll Play The Fool” by Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band peaked at number 100 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1971, “I'm Comin' Home” by Tommy James And The Shondells peaked at number 19 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1971, “If You Really Love Me” by Stevie Wonder peaked at number 60 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1971, “Life Is A Carnival” by The Band peaked at number 25 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1976, “Magic Man” by Heart peaked at number 26 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1976, “New York To L.A.” by Patsy Gallant peaked at number 6 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1971, “One Tin Soldier (The Legend Of Billy Jack)” by Coven peaked at number 88 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1976, “She's Gone” by Daryl Hall And John Oates peaked at number 7 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1971, “Some Of Shelly's Blues” by Nitty Gritty Dirt Band peaked at number 56 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1976, “Stay With Me” by Charity Brown peaked at number 61 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1971, “Tired Of Being Alone” by Al Green peaked at number 36 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1971, “Touch” by The Supremes peaked at number 71 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1976, “Why I Had To Pass This Way” by Carroll Baker peaked at number 67 on the Canada pop singles chart.

In 1971, “Yo-Yo” by The Osmonds peaked at number 1 on the Canada pop singles chart.

U.K. 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1976, ✪ “The Rubberband Man” by The (Detroit) Spinners peaked at number 16 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1971, “Butterfly” by Danyel Gérard peaked at number 11 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1976, “I'll Meet You At Midnight” by Smokie peaked at number 11 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1971, “I'm Leavin'” by Elvis Presley peaked at number 23 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1971, “Keep On Dancing” by Bay City Rollers peaked at number 9 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1971, “My Little Girl” by Autumn peaked at number 37 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1971, “Put Yourself In My Place” by The Elgins peaked at number 28 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1976, “Queen Of My Soul” by The Average White Band peaked at number 23 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1971, “Sultana” by Titanic peaked at number 5 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

In 1971, “The Lightning Tree” by Settlers peaked at number 36 on the U.K. pop singles chart.

Australian 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1971, ✪ “It's A Sin To Tell A Lie” by Gerry Monroe peaked at number 5 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1971, “Banks Of The Ohio” by Olivia Newton-John peaked at number 1 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1971, “Butterfly” by Matt Flinders peaked at number 6 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1976, “Dance With A Dolly (With A Hole In Her Stocking) / Why Do Fools Fall In Love” by Silver Studs peaked at number 17 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1976, “Don't Stop Believin' / Greensleeves” by Olivia Newton-John peaked at number 93 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1976, “I Only Wanna Be With You / Rock And Roller” by Bay City Rollers peaked at number 8 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1976, “James / All You Wanna Do Is Dance” by Billy Joel peaked at number 77 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1971, “Love Is A Beautiful Song” by Dave Mills peaked at number 2 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1976, “Say You Love Me / Monday Morning” by Fleetwood Mac peaked at number 38 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1976, “That'll Be The Day / Try Me Again” by Linda Ronstadt peaked at number 59 on the Australian pop singles chart.

In 1976, “With A Winning Hand / Drift Away” by Stars peaked at number 65 on the Australian pop singles chart.

New Zealand 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1976, “(Shake, Shake, Shake) Shake Your Booty” by K.C. And The Sunshine Band peaked at number 7 on the New Zealand pop singles chart.

In 1976, “Can't Change My Heart” by Cate Brothers peaked at number 40 on the New Zealand pop singles chart.

Netherlands 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1976, “Adiós Mexico” by La Costa peaked at number 21 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1976, “Dance Little Lady Dance” by Tina Charles peaked at number 8 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1971, “Freedom Come, Freedom Go” by The Fortunes peaked at number 12 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1976, “Heaven Must Be Missing An Angel” by Tavares peaked at number 1 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1976, “I Only Wanna Be With You” by Bay City Rollers peaked at number 9 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1971, “Karavaan” by Herman Lippinkhof en zijn Belcanto Kwartet peaked at number 23 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1976, “Let's Fall In Love” by Robin Sarstedt peaked at number 15 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1971, “Life Is A Carnival” by The Band peaked at number 26 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1971, “Only Lies” by Greenfield And Cook peaked at number 6 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1971, “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down” by Joan Baez peaked at number 10 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

In 1976, “The Price Of Love” by Bryan Ferry peaked at number 5 on the Netherlands pop singles chart.

Sweden 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1976, “Shout It Out Loud” by KISS peaked at number 16 on the Sweden pop singles chart.

Norway 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1976, “The Best Disco In Town” by The Ritchie Family peaked at number 10 on the Norway pop singles chart.

Switzerland 1970s Pop Singles Chart Peaks

In 1971, “We Are Goin' Down Jordan” by The Les Humphries Singers peaked at number 3 on the Switzerland pop singles chart.

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